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Level 1 Reconditioning Drill and Activities
 
From: FM 7-22 October 2012
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LEVEL I RECONDITIONING DRILLS AND ACTIVITIES
 
The exercise schedule shown in Table 6-1 provides guidance for conducting level I reconditioning. This schedule of activities will ensure safe reconditioning of Soldiers during the profile period. The physical profile of a medical officer supersedes the following:
  • The RPL briefs the profiled Soldier concerning which exercises are restricted and which they are to perform. The Soldier is also briefed on the use of ETMs (walking and swimming may also be appropriate).
  • As the Soldier improves and profiling limitations are removed, the Soldier may be transitioned into level II of the reconditioning program when transition criteria is met.

Table 6-1. Reconditioning Level I training schedule

Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri

PREP: PD
ETM 5 MIN

ACTIVITIES:
HIP STABILITY DRILL
4 FOR THE CORE
ETM 20-30 MIN

RECOVERY: RD
HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS

PREP: PD
ETM 5 MIN

ACTIVITIES:
HIP STABILITY DRILL
4 FOR THE CORE
STM 1 (1-3 SETS@10 REPS)

RECOVERY:RD
HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS

PREP: PD
ETM 5 MIN

ACTIVITIES:
HIP STABILITY DRILL
4 FOR THE CORE
ETM 20-30 MIN

RECOVERY: RD
HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS

PREP: PD
ETM 5 MIN

ACTIVITIES:
HIP STABILITY DRILL
4 FOR THE CORE
STM 1 (1-3 SETS@10 REPS)

RECOVERY: RD
HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS

PREP: PD
ETM 5 MIN

ACTIVITIES:
HIP STABILITY DRILL
4 FOR THE CORE
ETM 20-30 MIN

RECOVERY: RD
HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS

 

 

 

Before transition to level II, the RPL/ARPL ensures that the Soldier meets the criteria in Figure 6-2. If the Soldier cannot meet the transition criteria, he should be directed to the medical officer for re-evaluation.

Before releasing the Soldier back to unit PRT, the RPL/ARPL ensures the Soldier meets the criteria in Figure 6-3. If the Soldier does not meet these criteria before the recovery period ends, the RPL/ARPL will consult with the battalion medical officer to determine a proper disposition.

EQUIPMENT

When using equipment, endurance training includes four primary variables: exercise mode, training frequency, exercise duration, and training intensity. Exercise prescription specifies training frequency, exercise duration, and training intensity. The mode of exercise (type of equipment) is determined by environmental constraints and training according to physical profile limitations (temporary/permanent). Each ETM and STM contains specific instructions for proper use and adjustments to obtain optimal posture and technique during exercise (seat position on cycle ergometers, rowing machines, and STMs). If a piece of training equipment has no visible list of operating instructions, the RPL, ARPL, or gym personnel should be consulted for assistance.

EXERCISE MODE

Exercise mode refers to the specific activity performed by a Soldier: running, cycling, swimming, strength training, and endurance training equipment. Environmental constraints, safety for Soldiers on physical profile, and isolation of specific muscle groups to be trained during rehabilitation and reconditioning are some of the advantages of using STMs and ETMs. Consideration for use of specific types of equipment may be based on a Soldier’s range of movement, limb limitation and/or the ability to participate in weight-bearing or nonweight-bearing activities. Weight-bearing activities include walking or running on a treadmill and climbing on a stair climbing or stepping machine. Non-weight bearing and limited weight-bearing activities include use of cycle ergometers (upright/recumbent), elliptical trainers, rowers, climbing machines, and cross-country ski machines. Use of limited or non-weight-bearing endurance training equipment is desirable for obtaining higher caloric expenditure through additional training sessions by overweight Soldiers. Each of these modes typically provide the Soldier with a variety of individual exercise routines that monitor and display exercise duration, training intensity (heart rate/pace/watts, caloric expenditure, and distance completed miles/km). See Figure 6-5 for examples of various types of endurance training equipment. Use of STMs not only improves strength, but also builds muscle mass for higher caloric expenditure and stability for rehabilitation and reconditioning of the injured body part.

 

 

Figure 6-5. Endurance training equipment

 

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Training frequency refers to the number of training sessions conducted per day or week. Training frequency is determined by exercise duration and training intensity. Training sessions that involve high intensity or longer duration may necessitate less frequent training to allow for adequate recovery. Endurance and mobility, as well as strength and mobility training frequency, is three exercise sessions per week for each, for a total of six reconditioning PRT sessions. If five days of training occur, then three days are dedicated to endurance and mobility and two days are dedicated to strength and mobility for one week. The following week will consist of three days of strength and mobility and two days of endurance and mobility training.

EXERCISE DURATION

Exercise duration is 20 minutes or longer and varies from machine to machine, depending on the intensity of the exercise routine being performed (hill profile, speed, degree of incline, resistance). Most exercise sessions of high or moderate intensity should last 20 to 30 minutes. Endurance exercise sessions that address additional caloric expenditure for body fat reduction should be of low intensity and may last up to 60 minutes. The duration for STM exercise is 1-3 sets of 10 repetitions of each exercise for each major muscle group. Refer to the STM drill later in this chapter for specific instructions on the conduct of each exercise.

TRAINING INTENSITY

Training intensity is typically monitored and displayed on the exercise equipment control panel in terms of heart rate, pace (mph/kph, step rate), watts, kiloponds, caloric expenditure (kcals), or resistance for ETMs and weight lifted (number of plates, pin placement, pounds, or kilograms) for STMs.

STABILITY TRAINING

Stability is dependent upon structural strength and body management. Regular precise performance of 4C and the HSD form a foundation of good stability for physical performance. These drills are listed in detail throughout the following pages in this chapter.

 

From: FM 7-22 October 2012 

  (Page last modified Feb 1, 2013)

 
 
ArmyPRT.com is dedicated to providing all the information you need to conduct the Army Physical Readiness Training as an individual or with a unit.  Everything you need from FM 7-22 is right here.
 
Chapter 1 Approach
Chapter 2 System
Chapter 3 Leadership
Chapter 4 Types of Programs
Chapter 5 Planning Considerations
Chapter 6 Special Conditioning Programs
Chapter 7 Execution of Training
Chapter 8 Preparation and Recovery
Chapter 9 Strength and Mobility Activities
Chapter 10 Endurance and Mobility Activities
     
Appendix A Army Physical Fitness Test
Appendix B Climbing Bars
Appendix C Posture and Body Mechanics
Appendix D Environmental Considerations
Appendix E Obstacle Negotiation
     
   
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