Army PRT Information at ArmyPRT.com
We provide the easiest way to get all the information you need about the U.S. Army PRT Program - ArmyPRT.com
 
Home > Special Conditioning Programs > Level II Reconditioning Drills and Activities
 
Level II Reconditioning Drills and Activities
 
From: FM 7-22 October 2012
Print
Email
 

 

LEVEL II RECONDITIONING DRILLS AND ACTIVITIES

Soldiers in level II reconditioning are on profile, just off of profile, or cleared to begin level II reconditioning. These Soldiers will perform PRT drills and activities, in some cases, modified to fit the Soldier’s specific physical profile or level of injury. See Table 6-3 for the schedule of level II reconditioning drills and activities.

 

Table 6-3. Reconditioning Level II training schedule

 

Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri

PREP: PD
ACTIVITIES:

HSD (5 reps)
MMD1 (1 rep)
Walk to Run (30 min)

RECOVERY: RD

PREP: PD

ACTIVITIES:
4C (60 secs)
CD 1 (5 reps)
CL 1 (5 reps)

RECOVERY: RD

PREP: PD 

ACTIVITIES:
HSD (5 reps)
MMD1 (1 rep)
Walk to Run (30 min) 


RECOVERY: RD

PREP: PD 

ACTIVITIES
4C (60 secs)
CD 1 (5 reps)
CL 1 (5 reps) 


RECOVERY: RD

PREP: PD 

ACTIVITIES:
HSD (5 reps)
MMD1 (1 rep)
Walk to Run (30 min)


RECOVERY: RD

 

 

Preparation, military movement drill 1, CD 1, and recovery will be the same as for unit PRT or may be modified to follow a safe exercise progression. The CL will be performed with spotters as in unit PRT. Spotters must be especially aware of each Soldier’s physical limitation. The walk-to-run program safely progresses Soldiers from bouts of walking to increased bouts of continuous running for 30 consecutive minutes. Each week the walking time decreases as the running time increases to reach the 30-minute continuous running goal. (Table 6-4 shows how to conduct the walk-to-run program.)

 

Table 6-4. Reconditioning walk-to-run progression

 

Week of Training Walk Jog Repetitions Total Time
Week I 4 min 2 min 5 times 30 min
Week II 3 min 3 min 5 times 30 min
Week III 2 min 4 min 5 times 30 min
Week IV 1 min 5 min 5 times 30 min
Week V Run every other day with a goal of reaching thirty consecutive minutes.
  • Perform the activities for each level every other day.
  • Spend at least one week at each level. Begin Week V runs with a duration of 15 minutes.
  • Walk 5 minutes before and after each session. Progress to 30 consecutive minutes of running over the next 2 to 4 weeks.

 

 

 

Exercise Guidance

The following exercise guidance is intended for RPLs/ARPLs in the level II reconditioning program. Common sites of pain/injury are given, followed by a discussion of PRT progression. The information below assumes that all profile restrictions have been removed. General exercise guidance is provided for knee injury/pain, foot and ankle injury/pain; lower leg injury/pain, low back injury/pain, and shoulder injury/pain; as well as modifications to exercises based on limitations of various physical profiles. In the pages to follow each of these injury conditions are listed with specific guidance on the conduct of exercise drills and activities as they apply to the knee, foot and ankle, lower leg, back and shoulder pain, and injuries.

Knee Pain/Injury

Knee pain/injury may require restrictions. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

Resume lunging and squatting movements (to include the high jumper) with a reduced range of motion and fewer repetitions. The high jumper should not be resumed until the Soldier has demonstrated proficiency at all other exercises. Resume the high jumper by only rising to the toes on counts one and three, then gradually progress starting with minimal height and few repetitions. When performing the squat thrust, Soldiers should assume the front leaning rest position by initially stepping into and out of the squat position while bearing most of their body weight with their arms. Soldiers must gradually increase the range of motion and repetitions to meet the standards. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position. This should be done while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD1)

Resume MMD 1 by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements. For the shuttle sprint, ensure that the Soldiers are able to negotiate the turns at walking speed before allowing them to run.

Push-up and Sit-up Drill (PSD)

When performing the squat thrust, Soldiers assume the front leaning rest position by initially stepping into and out of the squat position while bearing most of their body weight with their arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position for the push-ups if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. To modify the sit-up, allow Soldiers to initially use their hands to move into and out of the supine position.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Soldiers performing CL 1 exercise modifications in level II reconditioning depend greatly on their spotters to assist them through the movements of each exercise. Gradually, they will need less help from the spotters. Eventually, they may complete many, if not all the repetitions, with little or no assistance.

Sustained and Speed Running

If running is restricted, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETM, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression should be followed. The Soldier must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing his symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

As with all lunges, the amount of knee bend may be restricted for the rear lunge. The starting position for the extend and flex may be assumed as shown for the front leaning rest position. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may still be limited. Gradually increase the range of motion over time and work toward the standard execution of each exercise.

Foot and Ankle Pain/Injury

PRT activities that involve jumping and landing, running, and single leg weight bearing should be resumed with the most caution. During the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

Resume this drill at a slow cadence with few repetitions. The Soldier should resume the high jumper only after demonstrating proficiency in all other exercises. The Soldier resumes the high jumper by only rising to the toes on counts one and three, and then gradually progressing, starting with minimal height and few repetitions. The instructor monitors lunges closely, since they require most of the body weight to shift to a single leg. The stress of lunges can be limited by reducing the stride and the depth of the lunge. Initially, Soldiers might need to do push-ups by stepping back into the front-leaning rest rather than by performing a squat thrust. The instructor allows the Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

Resume MMD 1 by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements. For the shuttle sprint, ensure that Soldiers are able to negotiate the turns at walking speed before allowing them to run.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position. This should be done while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands on spotting for all participants.

Sustained and Speed Running

While profiled for running, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETMs, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression must be followed. The Soldier must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing his symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

The starting position for the extend and flex may be assumed as shown for the front leaning rest position. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may be limited still. Over time, gradually increase the range of motion and work toward the standard execution of each exercise.

Lower Leg Pain/Injury

PRT activities that involve jumping, landing, and running should be resumed with the most caution. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

Resume this drill at a slow cadence with few repetitions. The high jumper should not be resumed until the Soldier has demonstrated proficiency at all other exercises. Resume the high jumper by rising to the toes only on counts one and three, then gradually progress starting with minimal height and few repetitions. Lunges should be monitored closely since they require most of the body weight to shift to a single leg. The stress of lunges can be limited by reducing the stride and the depth of the lunge. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

Resume MMD 1 by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping through the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands on spotting for all participants.

Sustained and Speed Running

While profiled for running, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETMs, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression should be followed. Soldiers must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing their symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

These exercises are generally not restricted, though Soldiers may need to use their hands to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may still be limited. Over time, gradually increase the range of motion and work toward the standard execution of each exercise.

Back Pain or Back Injury

PPRT activities that bend or twist the trunk must be resumed with caution. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

Exercises that bend or twist the trunk may have been restricted while on profile. Post-profile, the Soldier starts with a limited range of movement and gradually progresses to the standard positions. Lunges and the squat bender are generally well tolerated, because the trunk remains straight throughout the movement. Post profile, the Soldier resumes the high jumper by rising only to the toes on counts one and three, then gradually progress starting with minimal height and few repetitions. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

The shuttle sprint will normally be restricted by profile. In the post-profile period, resume the shuttle sprint without touching the hand to the ground on turns, and then gradually work toward bending enough to touch the ground. Resume the other MMD 1 exercises by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping through the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position while bearing most of their body weight with their arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands on spotting for all participants.

Sustained and Speed Running

If profiled for running, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETMs, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression should be followed. The Soldier must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing their symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

The extend and flex may be restricted by profile. Post-profile, Soldiers should go to the starting position by stepping back into the front-leaning rest position rather than performing a squat thrust. The other exercises should be tolerated in the post-profile period by starting with a reduced range of motion and gradually working toward the standard. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Shoulder Pain or Shoulder Injury

PRT activities that involve overhead motion or otherwise stress the shoulder must be resumed with caution. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

Exercises that include raising the arms overhead may be restricted by profile. These exercises, unless otherwise restricted by the profile, can still be performed with hands on hips. The push-up will usually be restricted while on profile. After profiling, the Soldier may need to resume the exercise with a modified hand position. Push-up progression may start from the knees. Gradually work toward the standard exercise positions.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

If this drill is restricted by profile, resume the exercises in the post-profile period by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence.

Sit-Up (SU)

Initially, allow Soldiers to use their hands to move into and out of the supine position. An alternate arm position with arms at sides or across the chest may be used.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL1)

Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands-on spotting for all participants.

Recovery (RD)

xtend and flex is generally the most stressful on the shoulder. The other exercises should be tolerated in the post-profile period by starting with a reduced range-of-motion and gradually working toward the standard. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

EXERCISE MODIFICATIONS

The PD, CD 1, military movement drill 1 (MMD 1), and the RD exercises include a wide range of movements requiring strength, endurance, and mobility using standing, seated, prone, and supine postures. Each exercise may be modified to accommodate various physical limitations. This allows Soldiers to work within their physical profiles, gradually progressing to performing each exercise to standard. The following pages describe each drill with exercise modifications to accommodate various physical profile limitations.

 

From: FM 7-22 October 2012 

  (Page last modified Feb 1, 2013)

 
 
 
ArmyPRT.com is dedicated to providing all the information you need to conduct the Army Physical Readiness Training as an individual or with a unit.  Everything you need from FM 7-22 is right here.
 
Chapter 1 Approach
Chapter 2 System
Chapter 3 Leadership
Chapter 4 Types of Programs
Chapter 5 Planning Considerations
Chapter 6 Special Conditioning Programs
Chapter 7 Execution of Training
Chapter 8 Preparation and Recovery
Chapter 9 Strength and Mobility Activities
Chapter 10 Endurance and Mobility Activities
     
Appendix A Army Physical Fitness Test
Appendix B Climbing Bars
Appendix C Posture and Body Mechanics
Appendix D Environmental Considerations
Appendix E Obstacle Negotiation
     
   
PRT Related News
PRT Downloads
 
FM 7-22 PDF PRT iPhone App
Quick Ref Guide All Downloads
 Suspension Trainer Information and videos
 Find us at facebook.com/armyprt
Recent Downloads
PRT News
Serving or Served, you need to Stay Informed. The Veteran Newsletter is a 100% Veteran Operated monthly newsletter that lets Veterans know about Benefits, Employment and Education Opportunities. VeteranNewsletter.com