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Initial Military Training Sustaining Phase PRT Schedule
 
From: FM 7-22 October 2012
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INITIAL MILITARY TRAINING SUSTAINING PHASE PRT SCHEDULES

Sustaining phase PRT activities should be used in AIT, OSUT (B/G phases), and BOLC B.

ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL TRAINING

Training schedule development in AIT is a complex process. Several variables impact the ability to apply one training schedule across all of AIT. These variables include: how units fill, length of the training cycle, student to leader ratio, training conducted by shift, availability of PRT training areas, MOS specific training requirements, equipment, and facilities; therefore, commanders and PRT leaders should apply the following doctrinal guidelines when developing their unit PRT schedules:

  • PRT sessions should be scheduled for four-to-five days per week, depending on the POI and course training schedule.
  • Alternate strength and mobility emphasis weeks with endurance and mobility emphasis weeks on five-day per week training schedules throughout the length of the training cycle. A strength and mobility emphasis week contains three strength and mobility training days and two endurance and mobility training days. An endurance and mobility emphasis week contains three endurance and mobility training days and two strength and mobility training days.
  • During four-day per week training schedules, alternate strength and mobility days with endurance and mobility days.
  • Utilize exercises, drills, and activities listed in paragraph 5-26 when developing AIT PRT schedules. See Chapters 9, Strength and Mobility Activities, and Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, for a detailed description of strength and mobility and endurance and mobility drills and activities.
  • Supplemental PRT exercises, drills, and activities found on the USAPFS website may be integrated into sustaining phase PRT schedules. Commanders and PRT leaders are responsible for ensuring Soldiers have achieved the appropriate level of fitness and motor skill development before conducting these more complex activities.
  • Strength and mobility exercise progression is accomplished by progressing from 5 repetitions of each exercise to a maximum of 10 repetitions per exercise. If more than 10 repetitions per exercise are desired, repeat the drill in its entirety. Examples of a rational progression include the following ranges of repetitions performed: PD (5-10 reps), CDs 1, 2, and 3 (5-10 reps), CLs 1 and 2 (5-10 reps), and the GD (1-3 reps).
  • For those strength and mobility exercises and drills that use time, a rational progression involves increasing the amount of time allocated for each exercise. Examples of a rational progression include: PSD (2-4 sets @ 30-60 seconds) and the strength training circuit (2-3 rotations @ 60 seconds).
  • The initial assessment for new fills is the 1-mile run assessment. This assessment is used to assign Soldiers to the appropriate running ability groups.
  • Sustaining phase ability group run (AGR) times are different from toughening phase AGR times. Refer to Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, Tables 10-3 and 10-4 for placing Soldiers into AGR groups, pacing, and split times.
  • Speed running is the most important endurance and mobility activity; therefore, speed running is scheduled at least one time per week. If there is only one endurance and mobility activity session scheduled per week, it will be speed running. Speed running includes the following activities: 30:60s, 60:120s, and the 300-yd SR. Speed running progression for 30:60s and 60:120s ranges from 6 to 10 repetitions. The 300-yd SR progresses from 1 to 3 repetitions.
  • Release runs and HR are a combination of sustained and speed running; however, these activities will not replace 30:60s, 60:120s, and/or the 300-yd SR. Release run progression should not exceed 30 minutes total running time. The progression for HR is running up or down gentle slopes progressing to steeper hills, distances of 40 to 60 yards, and increasing from 5 to 10 repetitions.
  • Foot marching is a movement component of maneuver and is a critical Soldier physical requirement. Regular foot marching helps to avoid the cumulative effects of lower-body injury trauma and prepares Soldiers to successfully move under load. Refer to FM 21-18, Foot Marching, for specific guidance on foot marching variables such as: terrain, frequency, load, rate of march, distance, visibility, halts, and rest. Length of the training cycle, MOS requirements, and POI will determine how these variables are applied to the PRT schedule.
  • If combatives training is conducted as a PRT session, it should be conducted only one time per week. Preferably, combatives should only replace a sustained running or foot march session during an endurance emphasis week and one of the three strength training sessions during a strength emphasis week.
  • Army Physical Fitness Tests will be conducted according to Appendix A of this FM and the course POI. Preferably, the APFT should be scheduled on Monday. If the APFT is not conducted on a Monday, then no PRT is scheduled on the day before the APFT.

AR 350-1 acknowledges that specified units and schools have separate physical fitness standards. Within AIT, examples include diving, parachute, and parachute rigger military occupational specialties (MOSs). Commanders that train MOSs that have separate PRT and testing requirements will request approval from the DCG-IMT to implement PRT exercises, drills, and activities to meet these higher physical fitness standards. The USAPFS can assist commanders with the development of PRT programs identified as having separate PRT and testing requirements.

Refer to Table 5-6, Sustaining Phase PRT Daily Session Overview, for an example of activity sequencing and session purpose. These activities increase in difficulty, complexity, intensity, and/or duration..

 

 Table 5-6. Sustaining phase PRT daily session overview (AIT and OSUT-B/G phases)

Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri  
Prep: PD
Activities: MMD 1&2, AGR or Release Run
Recovery: RD
Prep: PD
Activities: GD, CD 1&2, CL 1, PSD or STC and PSD
Recovery: RD
Prep: PD
Activities: MMD 1&2, 60:120s, 300 yd SR
Recovery: RD
Prep: PD
Activities: GD, CD 3, CL 2, PSD or STC and PSD
Recovery: RD
Prep: PD
Activities: MMD 1&2, Hill Repeats or Terrain Run or 10K FM w/fl
Recovery: RD
 
Monday
Preparation: PD Activities: MMD 1&2, AGR or Release Run Recovery: RD The purpose of this session is to improve the endurance and mobility needed for the successful performance of WTBDs. Preparation readies and conditions the body for a variety of body management competencies. Military Movement Drills 1 and 2 help improve running form while preparing the Soldier for sustained running. The Ability Group Run or Release Run improves aerobic endurance and speed through sustained running. Recovery safely returns Soldiers to a pre-exercise state while improving mobility
Tuesday
Preparation: PD Activities: GD, CD 1&2, CL 1, PSD or STC and PSD Recovery: RD The purpose of this session is to improve the strength and mobility needed for the successful performance of WTBDs. Preparation readies and conditions the body for a variety of body management competencies. The Guerrilla Drill develops functional mobility for the performance of combatives and the ability to carry another Soldier. Conditioning Drills 1 and 2 consist of calisthenics that are designed to functionally train upper body and trunk muscular strength and endurance needed to successfully perform WTBDs. Climbing Drill 1 improves the upper body and trunk strength needed for manipulating body weight. The Push-up and Sit-up Drill provide upper-body strength and APFT improvement. The Strength Training Circuit develops total body strength and movement proficiency. Recovery safely returns Soldiers to a pre-exercise state while improving mobility.
Wednesday
Preparation: PD Activities: MMD 1&2, 60:120S and 300 YD SR Recovery: RD The purpose of this session is to improve the conditioning required to successfully perform WTBDs such as IMT and move under direct and indirect fire. Preparation readies and conditions the body for a variety of body management competencies. The Military Movement Drills 1 and 2 help improve running form while preparing the Soldier for speed running. 60:120s enhance speed and anaerobic power through sustained repeats of high intensity running with intermittent periods of recovery. The 300-yd Shuttle Run develops anaerobic endurance and functional mobility. Recovery safely returns Soldiers to a pre-exercise state while improving mobility.
Thursday
Preparation: PD Activities: GD, CD 3, CL 2, PSD or STC and PSD Recovery: RD The purpose of this session is to improve the functional strength and mobility needed for the successful performance of WTBDs. Soldiers perform these drills wearing ACUs, boots, and ACH. Preparation readies and conditions the body for a variety of body management competencies. The Guerrilla Drill develops functional mobility for the performance of combatives and the ability to carry another Soldier. Conditioning Drill 3 consists of advanced calisthenics that improve power, coordination and agility. Climbing Drill 2 improves the upper body and trunk strength needed for manipulating body weight under load. The Push-up and Sit-up Drill provide upper-body strength and APFT improvement. The Strength Training Circuit develops total body strength and movement proficiency. Recovery safely returns Soldiers to a pre-exercise state while improving mobility.
Friday
Preparation: PD Activities: MMD 1&2, Hill Repeats or Terrain Run or 10K FM (aml) Recovery: RD The purpose of this session is to improve the strength, endurance, and mobility needed for the successful performance of foot marching and running over various terrains. Preparation readies and conditions the body for a variety of body management competencies. The foot march improves the muscular and aerobic endurance needed for foot marching. Hill Repeats and Terrain Running improve the Soldier’s ability to move quickly with agility over various terrains with or without a load. Recovery safely returns Soldiers to a pre-exercise state while improving mobility.
 
 Abbreviations

PD – Preparation Drill, 4C – Four for the Core, HSD – Hip Stability Drill, RD – Recovery Drill, CD – Conditioning Drill, CL – Climbing Drill, PSD – PU/SU Drill, SR – Shuttle Run, AGR – Ability Group Run, FM – Foot March, RR – Release Run, TR – Terrain Run, STC – Strength Training Circuit, FM-aml (foot march-approach march load)

 

OSUT

Physical readiness training in OSUT consists of a combination of toughening and sustaining phase exercises, drills, and activities. Commanders and PRT leaders should follow the toughening phase PRT schedule during the R/W/B phases of OSUT. Refer to Table 5-2 for the BCT and OSUT-R/W/B phase daily overview and for the toughening phase BCT and OSUT-R/W/B phase PRT schedule. During the B/G phases of OSUT, PRT schedules will be developed using sustaining phase exercises, drills, and activities found in paragraph 5-26. Refer to paragraph 5-28 and Table 5-6 for doctrinal guidelines when developing OSUT (B/G phase) PRT schedules.

BOLC B

The PRT schedule development for BOLC B is based upon adapting the conduct of sustaining phase exercises, drills, and activities to the course POIs and training schedules. Refer to paragraph 5-26 for PRT drills and activities selection, paragraph 5-28 for PRT scheduling guidelines, and Table 5-6 for a daily session overview. An example of a weekly PRT schedule and the purpose behind each session can be found in Table 5-6 also.

 

From: FM 7-22 October 2012 

  (Page last modified Feb 1, 2013)

 
 
 
ArmyPRT.com is dedicated to providing all the information you need to conduct the Army Physical Readiness Training as an individual or with a unit.  Everything you need from FM 7-22 is right here.
 
Chapter 1 Approach
Chapter 2 System
Chapter 3 Leadership
Chapter 4 Types of Programs
Chapter 5 Planning Considerations
Chapter 6 Special Conditioning Programs
Chapter 7 Execution of Training
Chapter 8 Preparation and Recovery
Chapter 9 Strength and Mobility Activities
Chapter 10 Endurance and Mobility Activities
     
Appendix A Army Physical Fitness Test
Appendix B Climbing Bars
Appendix C Posture and Body Mechanics
Appendix D Environmental Considerations
Appendix E Obstacle Negotiation
     
   
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