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Negotiation Standards for Conditioning Courses
 
From: FM 7-22 October 2012
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NEGOTIATION STANDARDS FOR CONDITIONING COURSES
 
The following paragraphs describe a variety of negotiation standards for successful completion of obstacle courses.
 
LANES TO GUIDE CHANGE OF DIRECTION
 
To successfully negotiate laned obstacles Soldiers must enter and exit the change of direction lanes while running, using the following technique. To change direction while running, plant the lead foot (left foot if the direction is to the right; right foot if the direction is to the left) firmly on the ground. Then, move the opposite foot in the new direction. The knees are flexed slightly and the center of gravity is low. Turn the head and trunk quickly in the new direction at the instant of the directional change.
 
DITCH
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle the Soldier must jump over the ditch while running and use the following technique. When jumping over a ditch, the takeoff foot is planted firmly and the spring comes from the extension of this leg as the other leg reaches for the opposite side of the ditch. Raise the arms forcibly forward and upward to assist in propelling the body. The landing may be on one or both feet, depending on the length of the jump.
 
CLIMBING ROPE
 
The following technique is used to successfully negotiate this obstacle. To initiate the climbing action, grasp the rope with the hands, palms toward the face. Grapevine the rope by wrapping it around the lower leg, crossing the instep. With the opposite leg, anchor the rope by placing the bottom of the foot on the instep. Stand up pushing down with the legs while reaching overhead grasping the rope at a higher point. Draw the knees toward the chest while allowing the rope to slide between the knees and feet. Repeat the following sequence to continue climbing:
  • Anchor the feet.
  • Stand up pushing down with the legs.
  • Reach overhead and re-grasp the rope.
  • Draw the knees toward the chest.
  • Re-anchor the feet on a higher point on the rope.
  • Repeat sequence until reaching the top of the rope.
 
LOGS
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, walk or run the log using the following technique. Place the feet on the log, hold the arms at the sides at shoulder level, and fix the eyes on the log approximately five yards in front of the feet. Walk or run the log by placing first one foot then the other in the center of the log, moving forward using the arms to maintain balance.
 
HORIZONTAL LADDER
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, traverse the ladder using the following technique. Grasp the first rung overhead with the palms facing forward and suspend the body. To propel the body forward, release one hand and move forward to secure a new grasp. At the same time, swing the opposite side of the body forward. Release the other hand and move it forward to re-grasp another rung. Continue this technique grasping each and every rung until reaching the last rung. Suspend the body from the last rung, then drop to the ground.
 
ALTERNATE HIGH STEPPING
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, enter and exit the maze while running, using the following technique. Run on the balls of the feet and raise the knees up high with each step while crossing over the obstacles and placing each foot in adjacent grid squares.
 
HORIZONTAL ROPE
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, traverse the rope using the following technique. Reach up and grasp the rope with both hands and swing the legs up to assume the position used when climbing a vertical rope. Leading with the head, traverse the rope horizontally by pulling with the arms. The feet and legs are used to secure the position on the rope and may also be used to assist in the movement as in the vertical rope climb. To complete negotiation of this obstacle, one hand must touch the post securing the end anchor point.
 
WIRE
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, enter and exit using the low crawl technique. Start in the prone position. To move forward, pull with both arms and push with one leg. The other leg is dragged behind. The legs are alternated frequently to avoid fatigue. Continue this technique until the body has cleared the low wire.
 
CARGO NET
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, approach the net while running. Leap to grasp the rope rungs overhead and step up on the lower rope rungs. The Soldier may use either of the following methods to climb the cargo net: The first technique performs alternating arm and leg movements (reach up with the right arm to grasp a higher rung while simultaneously stepping up with the left leg). The second technique would be to grasp and step with the same side arm and leg, ascending the rope in a crawling fashion. Continue this technique to the top of the net, then propel the body over the platform and descend the net on the other side using a similar technique.
 
FENCE
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, use the vaulting technique. Approach the fence at an angle with the hand on the side, next to the fence, placed on top of the fence. With a straight-arm movement, the Soldier pushes his body weight upward. At the same time, his leg on the side next to the fence is thrown upward and over the top, followed by his other leg. When landing, his weight comes down on his landing leg first, followed by regaining his balance on both legs. His free arm serves to balance him. A direct front approach can also be used, at which time both legs go over the fence together.
 
TRENCH
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, use the following technique. Jump downward into the trench, aiming the feet at the desired landing spot with the knees slightly bent, feet slightly apart, and trunk inclined slightly forward. As the feet strike the ground, the Soldier absorbs the shock by bending his knees to a squatting position. If the height is too great or the ground too hard to absorb the shock, he should land with his feet together and execute a forward or side roll to absorb some of the shock. To exit the trench, he uses one of the following techniques: Approach the trench wall at a run, jump forward and upward at it, and place one foot against the trench wall as high as possible. He uses the foot that is in contact with the wall to help push his body upward while grasping the top of the trench with his hands. He pulls his body up with his arms, assisted by the pressure of his foot against the wall and swings his legs over to propel himself out of the trench. Using the second technique, the Soldier approaches the trench wall at a run and jumps forward and upward. He hooks one elbow over the top of the trench, locking his arm in place by pulling up until the top of the trench is under his armpit. He grasps the top of the trench with his other hand. He draws his leg that is closest to the trench wall up toward his abdomen as far as possible, then swings his outside legs over the top of the trench. His body is then carried over with a rolling motion. Soldiers who are unable to draw up the leg as described can use a variation of this leg action. While hanging with both legs fully extended, he starts a swinging motion with his legs together. When his legs have enough momentum, he swings his outside leg over the trench wall with a vigorous kick, then follows with his body to exit the trench.
 
LOW RAILS
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, use the low crawl technique to move under the low rails.
 
PLANKS AND BEAMS
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, use the same technique listed to traverse the logs.
 
WALL
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, use either of the following techniques to surmount the wall. Run, jump, and vault. When using this method, the Soldier approaches the wall at a run, jumps forward and upward at it, and places one foot against the wall as high as possible. He uses his foot in contact with the wall to help push his body upward while grasping the top of the wall with his hands. He pulls his body up with his arms, assisted by the pressure of his foot against the wall, and swings his legs over to propel himself over the wall. The second technique is the hook and swing. The Soldier approaches the wall at a run and jumps forward and upward. He hooks one elbow over the wall, locks his arm in place by pulling up until the top of the wall is under his armpit. He grasps the top of the wall with his other hand. He draws his leg that is closest to the wall up toward his abdomen as far as possible, then swings the outside leg over the wall. The body is then carried over with a rolling motion. A variation of this leg action can be used by Soldiers who are unable to draw up the leg as described. While hanging with both legs fully extended, he starts a swinging motion with his legs together. When his legs have enough momentum, he swings the outside leg over the wall with a vigorous kick, then follows with his body. To drop from the wall to the ground, he places one hand against the far side of the wall while his other hand grasps the top. From this position, he rolls over the wall and vaults away from it with his legs swinging clear. As his body passes over the wall and drops, he faces the wall. He maintains his balance by retaining his grasp on the top of the wall as long as possible and then dropping to his feet.
 
LOW WALL
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, use the vaulting technique. The Soldier must approach the fence at an angle, his hand on the side next to the fence is placed on top of the fence, then with a straight-arm movement, he pushes his body weight upward. At the same time, his leg on the side next to the fence is thrown upward and over the top, followed by his other leg. In landing, his weight comes down on his landing leg first, followed by regaining his balance on both legs. His free arm also serves as a balance. A direct front approach can also be used, at which time both legs go over the fence together.
 
HURDLE
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, leap over the hurdle one leg at a time or step on the hurdle with one leg and leap down from the hurdle with the other or both legs to the ground.
 
PLATFORM
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, the Soldier surmounts the platform by using the support beams to step up and pull himself to the top. When jumping down from the platform to the ground, perform the same technique used for jumping downward from a height, as in negotiating a trench.
 
TUNNEL
 
To successfully negotiate this obstacle, two crawling methods may be used; the high crawl and low crawl. The Soldier performs the high crawl technique on his hands and knees. He propels himself forward by moving one hand forward while simultaneously moving his opposite knee forward. He continues moving on his hands and knees in an alternating fashion. The low crawl technique starts in the prone position. To move forward, he pulls with both arms and pushes with one leg. His other leg is dragged behind. Both legs are alternated frequently to avoid fatigue. The Soldier continues this technique until he exits the tunnel.
 
CONDUCTING THE CONDITIONING OBSTACLE COURSE
 
Before Soldiers run the CDOC in its entirety, they should be taken to each obstacle and instructed in the proper negotiation techniques previously mentioned. In each case the techniques should be explained in detail with emphasis on avoidance of injury. All Soldiers should be given the opportunity to practice on each obstacle until they become proficient at negotiation. Before the course is run against time, several practice runs should be run at a slower pace. During such practice runs, PRT leaders and AIs observe their performance and make appropriate corrections. Soldiers should never be permitted to run CDOCs for time until they have mastered all obstacles thoroughly. The best method of timing Soldiers on the obstacle course is to have the timer stand at the finish line and call out minutes and seconds as each Soldier crosses the finish line. If Soldiers fail to negotiate an obstacle, a predetermined penalty (5 to 10 seconds) should be assessed.
 

From: FM 7-22 October 2012 

  (Page last modified Feb 2, 2013)

 
 
 
ArmyPRT.com is dedicated to providing all the information you need to conduct the Army Physical Readiness Training as an individual or with a unit.  Everything you need from FM 7-22 is right here.
 
Chapter 1 Approach
Chapter 2 System
Chapter 3 Leadership
Chapter 4 Types of Programs
Chapter 5 Planning Considerations
Chapter 6 Special Conditioning Programs
Chapter 7 Execution of Training
Chapter 8 Preparation and Recovery
Chapter 9 Strength and Mobility Activities
Chapter 10 Endurance and Mobility Activities
     
Appendix A Army Physical Fitness Test
Appendix B Climbing Bars
Appendix C Posture and Body Mechanics
Appendix D Environmental Considerations
Appendix E Obstacle Negotiation
     
   
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