Army PRT Information at ArmyPRT.com
We provide the easiest way to get all the information you need about the U.S. Army PRT Program - ArmyPRT.com
 
Home > Leadership > Cooperation
 
Cooperation
 
From: FM 7-22 October 2012
Print
Email
 

COOPERATION

A successful PRT program requires the full cooperation of all Soldiers. Orderly movement of Soldiers and units requires a precise and unified effort. A Soldier belongs to a team that works smoothly when every Soldier plays his part. Each Soldier knows what to do in response to a command as well as what his fellow Soldiers must do. The Soldier’s confidence in the team grows until he feels as sure of them as he does of himself. The final result is teamwork, and teamwork is attained though the medium of drills.

A drill consists of certain movements that allow the unit to conduct an activity with order and precision. Drills train Soldiers to do their parts exactly so that, on command, the unit moves instantly and smoothly. Drill training starts the day a Soldier enters the Army. In the beginning, he is taught the movements of his feet and arms used in PRT, marching, and handling the weapon. He is trained in all these activities until he reaches a point where he does them automatically in response to a command. He is then placed in a unit and trained to do all these activities with other Soldiers. Squads, platoons, and companies drill with the smoothness of machinery. The result is cooperative, unified action—teamwork. Soldiers are at their best when inspired to have pride in themselves and their organization. This pride finds expression in perfect response to command.

MOTIVATION

Commanders and leaders at all levels may provide one of the best incentives for their Soldiers when they are visible and actively participate in PRT. When Soldiers feel their chain of command believes in PRT to the extent that they themselves regularly engage in the activities, they are motivated to greater effort. Troops also develop a greater esprit de corps and respect for their officers and NCOs when all actively participate. Finally, the frequent use of Soldiers as assistant instructors (AIs) also serves as an incentive. Soldiers will work hard for this honor and positively respond to AI responsibilities.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Leaders must provide facilities and funds to support a PRT program that will develop physical readiness in all Soldiers.

FACILITIES

Exercise drill activities require flat, grassy areas. The GD, speed, and sustained running require well lighted running routes, tracks, and marked fields. Strength development requires kettlebells, step-up benches, and climbing bars.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Leaders must follow training guidelines for individual, reconditioning, pregnancy, and post-partum weight control, APFT failure, and new Soldier programs.

EXERCISE NAMES

Soldiers learn all exercises by name, sequence, and movement. This ensures efficient use of time and precision of execution.

CORRECTIVE TRAINING

Assistant instructors must remove Soldiers who need corrective training from the formation. This applies to Soldiers not performing exercises, drills or activities to standard. The AI corrects all mistakes and ensures proper execution.

SCHEDULING AND SUPERVISING

Leaders responsible for scheduling and supervising PRT should take the following actions:

    • Make PRT as important as any other training activity.
    • Dedicate sufficient time for PRT (60 to 90 minutes).
    • Avoid substituting other training or routine duties during scheduled PRT.
    • Schedule and conduct PRT when it makes the most sense. Physical readiness training should not be reserved only for the early morning hours and may run during or at the end of the duty day.
    • Prevent the misuse of allotted PRT time by using qualified personnel to supervise and lead.
    • Provide for mass participation regardless of rank, age or gender during every PRT session.
    • Adhere to PRT schedules for the toughening and the sustaining phases.
    • Use appropriate PRT formations.
    • Use preparatory commands and commands of execution.
    • Use cadence appropriate for planned activities.
    • Require PRT leaders to lead and conduct activities with the Soldiers to determine appropriate intensity levels.
    • Require one AI for every 15 Soldiers.
    • Require AIs to supervise the execution of all PRT activities and make appropriate corrections.

Leaders have the latitude to adjust the PRT schedule to balance it with other training to avoid conflicts with physically demanding events that can lead to overtraining. For example, if the confidence obstacle course (CFOC) is the day’s main physical training event, leaders should not schedule strength training for PRT (unless it is conducted later in the training day). If conflicts cannot be resolved, PRT should be performed after a physically demanding event (later in the duty day), rather than before the event (in the morning) for safety reasons. It is also acceptable to not conduct the scheduled PRT session in order to provide adequate rest and recovery.

 

From: FM 7-22 October 2012 

  (Page last modified Jan 31, 2013)

 
 
 
ArmyPRT.com is dedicated to providing all the information you need to conduct the Army Physical Readiness Training as an individual or with a unit.  Everything you need from FM 7-22 is right here.
 
Chapter 1 Approach
Chapter 2 System
Chapter 3 Leadership
Chapter 4 Types of Programs
Chapter 5 Planning Considerations
Chapter 6 Special Conditioning Programs
Chapter 7 Execution of Training
Chapter 8 Preparation and Recovery
Chapter 9 Strength and Mobility Activities
Chapter 10 Endurance and Mobility Activities
     
Appendix A Army Physical Fitness Test
Appendix B Climbing Bars
Appendix C Posture and Body Mechanics
Appendix D Environmental Considerations
Appendix E Obstacle Negotiation
     
   
PRT Related News
PRT Downloads
 
FM 7-22 PDF PRT iPhone App
Quick Ref Guide All Downloads
 Suspension Trainer Information and videos
 Find us at facebook.com/armyprt
Recent Downloads
PRT News
Serving or Served, you need to Stay Informed. The Veteran Newsletter is a 100% Veteran Operated monthly newsletter that lets Veterans know about Benefits, Employment and Education Opportunities. VeteranNewsletter.com