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Commands
 
From: FM 7-22 October 2012
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COMMANDS

This section discusses the importance of proper commands. This cannot be underestimated. Invariably, PRT performance reflects the quality of its commands. Indifferent commands produce indifferent performance. When a command is given distinctly, concisely, with energy, and with proper regard to rhythm, Soldier performance will reflect it. See TC 3-21.5, Drill and Ceremonies, for detailed information of command voice, posture, and presence.

TYPES

The two types of commands used in PRT are preparatory commands and commands of execution. The preparatory command describes and specifies what is required. All preparatory commands are given with rising voice inflection. The command of execution calls into action what has been prescribed. The interval between the two commands should be long enough to permit the Soldier to understand the first one before the second one is given.

COMMAND DELIVERY

When the PRT leader addresses the formation and is commanding movement or announcing the name of an exercise, he does so from the position of attention. Exceptions are exercises that change position without returning to the position of attention.

When exercises are performed, Soldiers assume the proper starting position of each exercise on the command “Starting position, MOVE.” When conducting exercises, Soldiers are commanded to return to the position of attention from the terminating position of the exercise before they are commanded to assume the starting position for the next exercise. PRT leaders use the command “Position of Attention, MOVE”, to bring Soldiers to the position of attention from an exercise terminating position.

For example, this is how the PRT leader would conduct exercise 4, thigh stretch in the RD.

  • From the position of attention, the PRT leader commands, “THE THIGH STRETCH.”
  • Soldiers respond, “THE THIGH STRETCH.”
  • From the position of attention, the PRT leader commands, “Starting Position, MOVE.”
  • The PRT leader and Soldiers assume the starting position for the thigh stretch.
  • From the starting position, the PRT leader commands, “Ready, STRETCH.”
  • To change position, the PRT leader first commands, “Starting Position, MOVE.”
  • From the starting position, the PRT leader commands, “Change Position, Ready, STRETCH.”
  • Upon termination of the exercise, the PRT leader commands, “Starting Position, MOVE.”
  • The PRT leader assumes the position of attention and commands, “Position of Attention, MOVE.”

EXTENDED RECTANGULAR FORMATION

The Army’s traditional formation for PRT activities is the extended rectangular formation. It is best for platoon- to company-size formations because it is simple and easy to assume.

PLATOON ASSEMBLY

The PRT leader will position a platoon-size unit in a line formation so that the unit is centered and five paces away from the PRT platform after they have assumed the rectangular formation. Refer to Figure 7-1. The PRT leader gives the following commands:

  • “Extend to the left, MARCH.” Soldiers in the right flank file stand fast with their left arm extended sideward with palm down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. All other Soldiers turn to the left and double-time forward. After taking the sufficient number of steps, all Soldiers face the front and extend both arms sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. The distance between fingertips is about 12 inches and dress is to the right.
  • “Arms downward, MOVE.” The Soldiers lower their arms smartly to their sides. Soldiers in the right flank file lower their left arms to their sides.
  • “Left, FACE.” Soldiers execute the left face.
  • “Extend to the left, MARCH.” Soldiers in the right flank file stand fast with their left arms extended sideward with palm down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. All other Soldiers turn to the left and double-time forward. After taking the sufficient number of steps, all Soldiers face the front and extend both arms sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. The distance between fingertips is about 12 inches and dress is to the right.
  • “Arms downward, MOVE.” Soldiers lower their arms smartly to their sides. Soldiers in the right flank file lower their left arms to their sides.
  • “Right, FACE.” Soldiers execute the right face.
  • “From front to rear, COUNT OFF.” The front Soldier in each column turns his head to the right rear, and then calls off, “ONE,” and faces the front. Successive Soldiers in each column call off in turn “TWO,” “THREE,” “FOUR,” and so on. The last Soldier in each column will not turn his head and eyes to the right while sounding off.
  • "Even number to the left, UNCOVER.” Even-numbered Soldiers side step to the left squarely in the center of the interval, bringing their feet together. (See Figure 7-2.)

 

 Figure 7-1. Platoon rectangular formation

 

 

 

 

Figure 7-2. Platoon rectangular formation extended and uncovered

 

From: FM 7-22 October 2012 

  (Page last modified Feb 2, 2013)

 
 
ArmyPRT.com is dedicated to providing all the information you need to conduct the Army Physical Readiness Training as an individual or with a unit.  Everything you need from FM 7-22 is right here.
 
Chapter 1 Approach
Chapter 2 System
Chapter 3 Leadership
Chapter 4 Types of Programs
Chapter 5 Planning Considerations
Chapter 6 Special Conditioning Programs
Chapter 7 Execution of Training
Chapter 8 Preparation and Recovery
Chapter 9 Strength and Mobility Activities
Chapter 10 Endurance and Mobility Activities
     
Appendix A Army Physical Fitness Test
Appendix B Climbing Bars
Appendix C Posture and Body Mechanics
Appendix D Environmental Considerations
Appendix E Obstacle Negotiation
     
   
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