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Speed Running
 
From: FM 7-22 October 2012
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SPEED RUNNING

Speed running is based on the training principle that a greater amount of intense work can be performed if the work is interspersed with periods of recovery. Improvements in physical fitness are affected to a greater extent by the intensity of training than by the frequency or duration of the training. During speed running, Soldiers perform a work interval in a specified time for a specific number of repetitions. The work intervals are followed immediately by an active recovery interval. Multiple work intervals cause the onset of fatigue many times during a single training session. Speed running improves the resistance to fatigue of the active muscles by repeatedly exposing them to high intensity effort. As a result of their increased anaerobic and aerobic endurance, Soldiers are able to sustain performance of physically demanding tasks at a higher intensity for a longer duration. The training stimulus associated with speed running occurs from the combination of work and recovery. A very short recovery period may not allow the body to recover sufficiently to perform the next work interval at the desired intensity. A very long recovery period may allow the body to recover too much and some of the training effect would be lost. Generally, duration of the recovery period depends on the intensity and duration of the work interval. An appropriate work to recovery ratio for improving Soldier physical readiness is 1:2. Speed running has three variables: work duration, recovery duration, and the number of repetitions. The speed running activities appropriate for Soldiers to improve physical readiness and APFT 2-mile run performance are 30:60s and 60:120s. Refer to Table 10-2 for appropriate speed running prescriptions for the toughening and sustaining phases. When conducting speed running, the AIs will perform the activity by running with Soldiers in the unit. This allows the AI’s to continually monitor and motivate Soldiers throughout the conduct of the exercise. The PRT leader positions himself to supervise the conduct of speed running and uses a stopwatch and a whistle for signaling the “Start” and “Stop” of each work and rest interval. Refer to Table 10-2 for endurance and mobility activities, prescriptions of intensity, and duration and volume within the toughening and sustaining phases. In addition, Chapter 5, Planning Considerations, provides the template for commanders and PRT leaders to implement endurance and mobility activities into their PRT programs.

30:60S

Soldiers will perform 30:60s adhering to a work to recovery ratio of 1:2. During the work interval, Soldiers will sprint for 30 seconds. During the recovery interval, Soldiers walk for 60 seconds. This is one repetition of a 30:60. Speed running will cause Soldiers to spread out over the course of the running track during the work interval. If required, the PRT Leader will have Soldiers regroup before the start of the next work interval. Soldiers run at a slow pace (jog) ¼ mile before beginning 30:60s. Table 10-2 shows speed running progression. Soldiers should walk at least 3 minutes before performing additional activities or recovery.

60:120S

Soldiers perform 60:120s adhering to a work to recovery ratio of 1:2. During the work interval, Soldiers sprint for 60 seconds. During the recovery interval, Soldiers walk for 120 seconds. This is one repetition of a 60:120. Speed running causes Soldiers to spread out over the course of the running track during the work interval. If required, the PRT leader has Soldiers regroup before the start of the next work interval. All ability groups should run at a slow pace (jog) ¼ mile before beginning 60:120s. Table 10-2 shows speed running progression. Soldiers should walk at least 3 minutes before performing additional activities or recovery.

TRAINING AREAS FOR SPEED RUNNING

Ideally, the training area for the conduct of 30:60s and 60:120s is a ¼-mile or a 400-meter oval running track. The PRT leader should stand in the middle of the training area so he can see all Soldiers. From there, the Soldiers can easily hear his whistled commands to start and stop walking and running intervals. If 30:60s or 60:120s are conducted on a road, the route MUST be wide enough for Soldiers to turn around and not collide. The recommended distances for conducting 30:60s or 60:120s on a straight road course is at least 100 yards and a maximum of 200 yards (Figure 10-10).

 

 

 

Figure 10-10. Speed running on a straight course

 

300-YARD SHUTTLE RUN

The 300-yard SR run develops the ability to repeatedly sprint after changing direction. It is an indicator of the Soldier’s anaerobic endurance, speed, and agility. The 300-yard SR is conducted from the extended rectangular formation (covered) as shown in Figure 10-3. On the command, ”Ready,” one Soldier in each column will move behind the starting line and assume the ready position (staggered stance). On the command, “GO,” Soldiers sprint to a line 25-yards from the starting line. They must touch the line or beyond it with their left hand, then return to touch the starting/finish line with their right hand. This is considered one repetition. Soldiers will perform six repetitions alternating touching the lines with opposite hands. On the last (sixth) repetition, Soldiers sprint past the starting/finish line without touching it. The PRT leader and AIs ensure that Soldiers sprint in their own lanes and run with their heads up to watch for other Soldiers who may be moving in the opposite direction. Figure 10-11 shows the running patterns and requirements of the 300-yard SR. Refer to Table 10-2 for endurance and mobility activities, prescriptions of intensity, duration, and volume within the toughening and sustaining phases. In addition, Chapter 5, Planning Considerations, provides the template for commanders and PRT leaders to implement endurance and mobility activities into their PRT programs.

 

Figure 10-11. 300-yard shuttle run

 

From: FM 7-22 October 2012 

  (Page last modified Feb 2, 2013)

 
 
ArmyPRT.com is dedicated to providing all the information you need to conduct the Army Physical Readiness Training as an individual or with a unit.  Everything you need from FM 7-22 is right here.
 
Chapter 1 Approach
Chapter 2 System
Chapter 3 Leadership
Chapter 4 Types of Programs
Chapter 5 Planning Considerations
Chapter 6 Special Conditioning Programs
Chapter 7 Execution of Training
Chapter 8 Preparation and Recovery
Chapter 9 Strength and Mobility Activities
Chapter 10 Endurance and Mobility Activities
     
Appendix A Army Physical Fitness Test
Appendix B Climbing Bars
Appendix C Posture and Body Mechanics
Appendix D Environmental Considerations
Appendix E Obstacle Negotiation
     
   
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